Hot Dog by Kaitlin Brubaker

6 Dec

A cylindrical sausage-like food sits in between a bun of the same shape that fits the object perfectly in its butterfly-cut wings. The meat of which this food is made is unclear, yet childhood memories bring a long forgotten urge to eat it regardless of what may be inside. Under a blanket of sweet relish lie layers of tart mustard and creamy ketchup atop a bed of succulent grilled onions. With a mouth-watering aroma it waits, soon to be devoured by barbeque patrons, bonfire enthusiasts, and plain ol’ hungry folks. Merriam-Webster’s word of the day describes not this hotdog; this hotdog lacks even the proper part of speech. Hotdog (v.) has the definition: ”

to perform in a conspicuous or often ostentatious manner; especially: to perform fancy stunts and maneuvers (as while surfing or skiing).”

A word of the day should be memorable, grab the reader’s interest, and be easy to use if desired. Hotdog being a word that describes an action has taken on a new and intriguing persona. The word has lost its delicious edge and has gained an active meaning — ironically opposite, don’t you think? Some say the English language is tricky in this way. to hear hotdog used any other way than the most used food definition would cause confusion in any poor foreigner. Alas, the word can yet again be used as an exclamation; though seldom, discovery or joy brings forth “hotdog!” as a form of showing excitement.

Hotdog may describe a grilled, boiled, or microwaved meal favored by young children, and some days it may be shouted in glee. However, Merriam-Webster chose to show readers that it may be used when looking to express a deed done in exuberance or an overly flashy manner. The English language is amazing in that way; a simple word can have numerous meanings that relate to each other in absolutely no way. Hotdog! Today a new meaning of hotdog has been highlighted and shared with those who may not have known it prior to the word-a-day article.

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