Working is a Blessing by Rachelle Lonvera

1 Dec
Most people take for granted a privilege that often times feels like a burden. At the age of twelve, Russell Honore began his first job working part-time on a neighbor’s dairy farm. He then went on to join the ROTC program to help pay his way through college. Honore’s father advised him to study something in college that he enjoyed so that when he chose a career, he would always look forward to going to work. However his father made it clear that, “Even having a job you hate is better than not having a job at all.” Honore believes that working gives one a sense of freedom and builds character.
            In the 1980’s Honore witnessed something that helped him see the freedom that a job can provide. While on a visit to Bangladesh, Honore saw a woman hammering bricks while carrying a baby on her back. “I asked a Bangladesh military escort why they weren’t using a machine, which would have been a lot easier,” explains Honore. The man told Honore that if they had used a machine, the woman would not have a job and she would not be able to support her and family. Honore witnessed many more situations similar to the one of the woman and the baby throughout his military career. A job allows someone to earn money to provide for not only themselves but for their family, as well. That is something they would not be able to do otherwise. People without a job are not free; they are victims of a life of unrest. Working shapes a person’s character into that of a hardworking and self-established person.
            Russell Honore grew up working at an early age and did not stop until the age of 52. Honore’s father instilled a lesson in him that he would never forget; working is a blessing. Through his own experiences while serving in the army, Honore realized the true value of working. Working builds character and gives freedom to those who have the blessing of having a job. One can rise above social unrest and crime by finding a job that will set them on the right path.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: